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Honda BR V First Impression

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Honda BR V Overview

Rewind a couple of years. A conventional ‘badi gaadi’, the ‘big’ car everyone wanted, was a sedan. Now, however, preferences have clearly changed. Everyone wants to be seen in an SUV, sitting high off the ground and not give two hoots about the pothole-ridden roads.

Manufacturers are more than willing to oblige as well. Over the past few years, our market has been bombarded with compact and sub-compact SUVs, priced on par with the conventional three-box sedan. Honda is slightly late to the party with the BR-V. Nonetheless, it wants to take on established rivals, such as the Hyundai Creta and the Renault Duster. Well, can it? Let’s find out!

Honda BR V Exteriors

The design of 2016 Honda BR-V is based on the new Active-Solid Motion language which brings a sense of flow to make it look premium as well as add the necessary tough elements by giving it a bold exterior. The same is vindicated when the front profile is considered which is reminiscent of the Honda CR-V. This particular trait will work in favor of the BR-V for the target customer to strike an instant connect.

The sleek headlights along with the macho and solid chrome band flowing along the width consist of the upper half of the profile. A closer look also reveals the additional details connected to the grille like the smaller section underneath as well as the wire mesh between the front grille and the bumper. The headlights feature projectors without daytime running lamps. We feel the same shall be added in the final production top end variant.

The front bumper gets a taller central area with larger central air intake section. Fog lamps come with a chrome surround and there are characteristic arches on the bumper. There are bash plates, finished in brushed aluminum, under both the front and rear bumpers. The bonnet placement is also taller and features power lines along its edges. To the silhouette, there are flared wheel arches with rugged matte cladding running over the wheel arches and along the rocker moulds flowing throughout the lower profile.

There are wedge lines on the side to make sure the length does not get a bland look and the larger sheet metal area gets covered smartly. Again interestingly, the window line rises from the front wheel arches before dipping down under the B-Pillar and then again rising towards the rear profile giving both the front and rear windows greater visibility. The window outline is blackened while the ORVMs come in a two-tone finish with turn indicators embedded in it. There are bright aluminum finished roof rails as well. The ground clearance of the Honda BR-V is 201mm and it runs on 196/60 R16 tyres with machined alloys.

The rear quarter view too continues to look as inspiring as the front with a solid D-Pillar wrapped around the tail section. Even the subtle flair on the rear wheels is carried to the tail lid. It has to be the rear which earns more points for this one seeks inspiration directly from Honda Odyssey making it look totally international. Even the tail gate looks well proportionate to the overall design and has uniquely styled joint taillamps. The larger rear windshield makes it easy to maneuver the car in reverse. The registration display area is positioned at the lower section with a chrome garnish.

Honda BR V Interiors

Inside the Honda BR-V, the interiors again remind you of the one in Mobilio and Jazz with a similar layout and feel. Agreeably, Honda’s knack of maintaining its appeal by giving a stronger built quality and well trimmed interiors has always worked in all its cars and the same will be seen in this new crossover.

Firstly, getting inside is not difficult even for taller passengers as the larger front and rear doors guarantee good ingress and egress. The seats came in two versions, the first being rich quality leather and the second with premium fabrics. We expect the BR-V to sport the former as standard in their top end variant. The front row seats are comfortable and can be easily adjusted according to any size of passengers but then they aren’t wide enough which makes it a tight squeeze. Similarly, in the second row everything is acceptable and the larger window area also offers proper visibility but then passengers might have to fight it out in terms of space. There is a third as well but with a flatter profile, its best for kids and luggage.

Even though, conventionally, India has a liking for beige interiors but personally all-black finish has always been my favourite as they tend to make the cabin look a lot classier. On the BR-V, it is very straight cut and simple with the familiar layout of things. The steering wheel has controls to alter volume and change mode of entertainment while the instrumental cluster is simple triple-ring binnacle with a chrome surround. There is a gear shift indicator too located inside the tacho ring. One can access all information about the vehicle regarding trip readings, mileage and instantaneous consumption on the third screen.

The central console sports a touchscreen unit with navigation and Bluetooth compatibility. One can also stream music using a phone as well as connect via USB and Aux-In options. It also gets a piano black finish around the central area. Just below that is the air-conditioning system with automatic climate control but this one is not a touchscreen type like that in the Honda City and instead has conventionally styles buttons to operate with a digital temperature display.

In terms of practicality, there are multiple storage options like the twin cup holder on the central zone, pockets on door trims, glove box, one common pocket for the rear occupants and a large boot space. We do not have the exact quantity of bootspace as this was a prototype and not an actual production variant. Even then the boot space looked sufficiently large to accommodate multiple bags. There is also an option of folding down the third row of seats to increase the boot space. To know more info on Honda BR V check Midasedu

Honda BR V Engine

The diesel SUV gets the 1.5-litre i-DTEC engine from the City. The unit is quiet at idling, but gets noisy post 2,000rpm and stays that way to its 4,000rpm redline. But, according to Honda, the NVH has improved compared to the Mobilio. And one can tell both at idle and when driving. The engine makes 99bhp of max power and 200Nm of peak torque. In the real world this means good pulling power even from lower revs. Only catch is to avoid slipping under 1500rpm to avoid the lag. Power is sent to the front wheels through a six-speed manual gearbox which is a little notchy but the light clutch makes easy work of driving in traffic.

The petrol BR-V is powered by a 1.5-litre i-VTEC mill that belts out 118bhp of power and 145Nm of torque. This comes mated to a six-speed manual as well. But, additionally, there’s the option of an automatic, a CVT to be precise. This one too uses a front-wheel-drive layout. The petrol is quieter and more refined compared to the diesel. It revs well too and is best enjoyed when given the stick.

The Honda BR-V, for all its SUV posturing, still doesn’t lend high seating. Which isn’t bad given it is more comfortable as a result and because the visibility, particularly over the hood, is good, it never feels difficult to drive or manoeuvre. It is easy to live within the city helped by a relatively tight 5.3m turning radius. The steering is light and responsive and it also weighs up nicely at speeds. The ride is sorted too. It is firm but is absorbent at speed and doesn’t thud too much over poor roads either. And it manages unseen speed bumps and undulations well too. Straight-line stability again is commendable and the BR-V feels confident and completely home handling the fast sweeping corners too. To top it all, the brakes have good bite and progression and there’s ABS in this top of the line VX version for added reassurance.

With ARAI claimed fuel efficiencies of 15.4kmpl for the petrol and 21.9kmpl for the diesel, the car boasts of the best-in-segment fuel economy. Pretty impressive on paper. The figures in real world conditions will be clear when we do a thorough road test soon. First impressions suggest- it won’t be a tough task.

Honda BR V Riding

The BR-V’s ride is forgiving and absorbs most of the undulations our roads will ever throw at it. It is stiffly sprung, but not up to the point where the ride becomes jarring. At low speeds, the 210mm of ground clearance and the India-friendly suspension dismiss the potholes and broken roads without a hiccup. The ride is slightly bouncy at the second and third row but is tolerable for shorter journeys.

Handling has been the Japanese carmaker’s forte for long. The steering weight and feel are just about right. It is wonderfully light at low speeds letting you chuck the thing around with a finger. However, the turning radius is gigantic thanks to the length. Taking a U-turn is a task in itself. Other than that, the BR-V is sure-footed and doesn’t mind being thrown around a series of bends. There’s enough feedback that gives you the confidence to push it through the corners as well.

Braking duties are taken care of by disc brakes at the front, and drums at the rear. Braking power is adequate and the SUV doesn’t nose dive a lot under heavy braking and manages to maintain its line as well. Safety is taken care of by dual airbags that are standard across the range.

Honda BR V Safety

The braking system of Honda BR-V features disc brakes at the front and drum brakes at the rear. The ABS with EBD is used as a standard in all variants except the petrol E variant.The body shell is made strong with ACE body structure and front dual airbags are introduced in all variants for complete safety of the occupants.

Honda BR V Cost in Mumbai

Honda BRV On Road Price is 5,65,118/- and Ex-showroom Price is 4,82,417/- in Mumbai. Honda BRV comes in 6 colours, namely Carnelian Red Pearl,Taffeta White,Urban Titanium,Golden Brown,Orchid White Pearl,Alabaster Silver. Honda BRV comes with FWD with 1497 CC Displacement and 4 Cylinders with Maximum Power 119 bhp@6600 rpm and Peak Torque 145 Nm@4600 rpm DRIVE TRAIN FWD and reaches 100 KMPH at N/A . Honda BRV comes with Manual Transmission with FWD .Check for Honda BR V price in Mumbai at Autozhop.

Honda BR V Conclusion

Honda is a little late to the compact SUV party. But, the BR-V has its USPs, its pluses, which should have buyers consider it. Three rows of seating for one. Then you have efficient engines, utility, dynamics and a premium badge to sweeten the deal. However, do note, the BR-V cannot off-road, it doesn’t pack in as many features or exude the same aura of premiumness as the Creta. The decider now will be its pricing. If priced under the Duster and the Creta, and by a noticeable margin, the Honda BR-V is certainly worth it.

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