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Ford Figo Facelift First Drive Review

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Ford Figo Overview

The headline with the Figo facelift isn’t that it’s got the most powerful engines in its class, or that it’s the only hatchback in this range to offer six airbags, or even the 5 year/unlimited km warranty.

It’s the fact that at a starting price of Rs 5.15 lakh, ex-showroom, the new Figo undercuts itself by Rs 67,000! Ford cut prices with the recent Endeavour facelift too, and it’s something that definitely gets the right kind of attention. Further, the Figo lineup has been simplified to three variants, and three engines. There’s the 1.2-litre with a five-speed manual, or a 1.5-litre with a six-speed automatic. These are the three-cylinder ‘Dragon’ petrol motors, as selectively available on the Aspire, EcoSport and Freestyle. The 1.5-litre diesel carries forward unchanged.Check for Ford Figo price in Hyderabad.

Ford Figo Exterior & Design

If you’ve seen the 2018 Aspire facelift, consider that you’ve seen the Figo facelift as well, at least from the front. The updated headlamps, the front grille and the bumper design are borrowed from the Aspire. In the Figo Titanium Blu variant that we drove, the front grille is done in glossy black and there are blue inserts in the front bumper (chrome in the lower Titanium variant). It gets contrasting black roof and ORVMs as well. At the rear, the Figo gets a new bumper and revised tail lamp detailing. The multi-spoke black alloy wheels in the Titanium Blu variant are 15-inch units. These are shod with 195/55 R15 rubber, making them significantly wider than 175/65 R14 rubber on lower variants. The Titanium variant gets 14-inch silver alloy wheels.

With all these changes, the Figo looks fresher than before, but does it look modern? Not really. A rear spoiler, skirts, LEDs in the head and tail lamps and DRLs could have made the Figo Titanium Blu a looker. LED elements would have also made the lower Titanium variant look more in line with the times. So, while the updated Figo looks better than before, its appearance alone is still unlikely to seal the deal for many.

Ford Figo Interior & Cabin

Not much has changed inside, and you’re still greeted by an all-black theme. There are piano black finishes on the centre console and steering wheel, which add a bit of upmarket feel, the dials now get a carbon fibre-like finish, which improves the look, but they still feel a bit too small. The overall fit and finish might not be class-best, but it does feel built to last. There are plenty of storage places in the cabin for the front passengers, with huge door pockets, a big glovebox and multiple stowage areas between the seats.To know more information on Ford Figo visit Midasedu

Those front seats of the Titanium Blu variant get contrast blue stitching, which lends a sporty look. The cushioning is on point and the long seat base provides good under-thigh support. The side bolstering is also adequate and helps keep you in place while on bends. Overall visibility from the driver’s seat is good, and despite the fact the outside mirrors are tiny, the view they offer isn’t bad at all. In the back seat, there’s adequate legroom, thanks to the scooped-in backs of the front seats, and just like at the front, the long seat base provides good under-thigh support. The bench, however, is flat, the backrest is set upright and tall passengers will find the headroom to be tight. You still don’t get door pockets or a centre armrest, but Ford has listened to customer feedback and provided adjustable headrests. The boot space is a decent 257 litres, but the loading lip is high and the boot floor is low, so loading big bags will require some effort.

On the equipment front, the Figo remains quite well equipped, with auto climate control, power-folding mirrors, an auto-dimming rear-view mirror, auto headlamps and auto wipers. But now you have a much-needed touchscreen, a 7.0-inch unit, available in the mid-spec and top-end variants. However, it doesn’t get Ford’s class-leading Sync 3 operating system (available on the top-end Aspire) and hence misses out on Android Auto and Apple CarPlay connectivity. Instead, it’s a simpler unit with embedded navigation, and there is, of course, USB, aux and Bluetooth connectivity.

Ford Figo Engine & Gearbox

The 1.2-litre and 1.5-litre three-cylinder petrols are new to the Figo, but we’ve experienced them before on other Fords. The gearbox, though a five-speed, is new to the Figo again (borrowed from the Freestyle) and said to be lighter, in weight and on maintenance. Gearing is slightly taller compared to the Freestyle, thanks to a revised final drive ratio, possibly helping it to its 20.4kmpl claimed efficiency figure. The 1.2-litre packs 96PS and 120Nm torque, making it the most powerful in a segment where others offer figures in the mid-80s. The 1.5-litre similarly boasts of a segment-leading 123PS and 150Nm torque, and it’s mated to the only torque converter in its class. Like we mentioned earlier, the 1.5-litre diesel is unchanged and makes 100PS and 215Nm of torque.

We had the two manuals to test – the petrol and the diesel. And having recently experienced this same engine in the Freestyle, the Figo immediately feels easier to drive around, needing less shifts in the city. The shift action also feels more positive, and the light clutch also feels less sticky than we remember. As before, the ‘Dragon’ engine sounds fairly refined for a three-cylinder but that changes when the revs climb. We say when, because this engine does feel like it takes its own time to build revs, and starts sounding rough above 4,000rpm. If you’re in the mood to hustle, response above 2,500rpm is immediate, though we would’ve liked more engine braking after lifting off the throttle. We’ve been told the fueling has been adjusted to make sure the on-off throttle transition feels smooth, but it feels a little disconcerting at first.

Ford Figo Driving Dynamics

Compared to the tremendous first-gen car, the dynamics of the second-generation Figo felt a lot softer and more comfort-oriented. Things were quite different, however, with the 2017 Sports Edition, which handled much better than the regular Figo, thanks to the re-tuned, lower suspension, 15-inch wheels and a beefier anti-roll bar. This facelift gets the bigger wheels and anti-roll bar, and while the suspension has been re-tuned, it hasn’t been lowered. So yes, while the front stays planted in fast cornering, the car is not quite as sharp as the Sports Edition. What it is, instead, is a good halfway point between the sharpness of the Sports Edition and the comfort of the standard, pre-facelift car, which is more suited for everyday driving.

The suspension handles bad roads with ease and is silent in operation with only sharp potholes being registered inside the cabin. However, over a patch of bad roads, there is a hint of bobbing which is evident. The steering stays light in the city and weights up nicely as you gain speed on the highways, and through all this, it still offers possibly the sharpest turn-in in the class. This remains the mid-range hatchback of choice if you enjoy driving.

Ford Figo Braking & Safety

The top-spec Figo remains the only car in its segment to feature six airbags. In its automatic avatar, the Figo also gets electronic stability programme, traction control and hill launch assist. Now that Ambiente is the Figo’s base variant, dual front airbags and ABS are standard. Over the previous pre-facelift Figo Ambiente, this variant is equipped with day/night IRVM, rear parking sensors and vanity mirror on the passenger sunvisor. On the whole, all Figo variants are now more equipped than before and yet cost lesser.

Ford Figo Cost in Hyderabad

Ford Figo On Road Price is 6,85,403/- and Ex-showroom Price is 5,82,600/- in Hyderabad. Ford Figo comes in 7 colours, namely Deep Impact Blue,Smoke Grey,Ingot Silver,Tuxedo Black,Sparkling Gold,Oxford White,Ruby Red. Ford Figo comes with FWD with 1196 CC Displacement and 4 Cylinders with Maximum Power 87 bhp@6300 rpm and Peak Torque 112 Nm@4000 rpm DRIVE TRAIN FWD and reaches 100 KMPH at N/A . Ford Figo comes with Manual Transmission with FWD .

Ford Figo Conclusion

Ford has cut down the number of variants from five to just three (Ambiente, Titanium and Titanium Blu) and the prices start from Rs 5.15 lakh for the base 1.2 petrol, going up to Rs 7.74 lakh for the top-end diesel Titanium Blu. The 1.5 automatic is available only in the mid-spec Titanium variant for Rs 8.09 lakh (all prices, ex-showroom India). That works out to an average of Rs 40,000 less, variant for variant, compared to the earlier Figo!

The Freestyle, launched almost a year before, showed us pretty much exactly what we would be getting with this Figo facelift, so it wasn’t much of a surprise. But then that’s no bad thing, because the Figo comes together as an excellent all-round package. We just wished the top equipment level – 6 airbags, auto lamps and wipers etc – wasn’t restricted to the ‘Blu’ styling package because the racy decals and black accents might not be to everyone’s taste.

The equipment upgrades are welcome, but also necessary amidst aggressive competition, but we really wish they’d have sprung for the higher-spec infotainment unit with Android Auto and Apple Carplay, which has quickly become the norm for cars with touchscreens. The new petrol engine (and the accompanying gearbox) does its best work in this hatchback, where you’ll be more inclined to wring it out and get the best out of it. The diesel, as ever, is an absolute gem.

So, while the Figo has been updated, the proposition hasn’t changed. It still remains the one to pick if you enjoy driving, with strong engines and excellent dynamics. What’s more, you’ll get a lot more peace of mind now, as Ford has pushed towards highly competitive ownership costs and offers a 5-year extended warranty. And all this, at a more affordable price.

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